Pump, ready for the dump

This asthmatic car tyre pump came in to the workshop with little going for it.  The owner had been very close to throwing it away when he came across my website.

This AirMan pump is designed to be plugged in to a car’s cigarette lighter socket and provide quick and convenient car tyre inflation.  This one was dead.

On first inspection, the fuse was OK, the switch seemed to work and all connections seemed sound, when tested with a multi-meter.

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FixItWorkshop, Worthing, May’17 AirMan Car Tyre Pump, repaired

Off with the cover…

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FixItWorkshop, Worthing, May’17 AirMan Car Tyre Pump, repaired- cover removed

When the motor was removed from the cam driving the piston, the bit that drives the pump, it spun freely when power was applied, using a battery in the workshop.

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FixItWorkshop, Worthing, May’17 AirMan Car Tyre Pump, repaired- gear wheel

Seemingly, the centre spindle was protruding far beyond it’s specified reach, causing the pump connection rod to it it during rotation.  Why?  To be frank, I wasn’t sure. I can only surmise that the vibration and heat had caused the flywheel/ toothed drive to slide outside of specification.

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FixItWorkshop, Worthing, May’17 AirMan Car Tyre Pump, repaired- washer

There appeared to be room for a small washer to take up the excess space, so I fitted one I had lying around.

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FixItWorkshop, Worthing, May’17 AirMan Car Tyre Pump, repaired- pump now in line with washer

The washer, once fitted, allowed the flywheel/ toothed drive to sit ‘square’ in-line with the pump.

Once resembled, the pump ran freely and was ready to inflate, once more.

Cost of a new pump, circa £20.  Cost of the washer, circa 5p.

Leaking Reginox Miami Tap

Reginox tap gets a new mechanism.

A friend of mine had long been complaining about a leaking tap in his kitchen for some time, so it was a long overdue job for me to tackle.

A quick look online revealed lots of videos and help, but nothing covering the actual problem in this instance.

The tap spout was leaking from the swivel joint where the spout body is allowed to move approximately 180 degrees to move from sink to sink, in this case.  This is a fairly common problem for taps (faucet if you’re in America) of this design and sooner or later they all seem to suffer.

I was interested to know if the parts were available, but Internet searches revealed nothing.  An email to Reginox UK was answered very quickly and I was referred to Mayfair Brassware Ltd, the manufacturers of the tap in this instance.  The parts were quickly identified and delivered next day. Both companies were very helpful and efficient, useful for a non-plumber, like myself.

The cost of replacing the tap was about £50, so the £5 spent on replacement seals was well worth it.  The whole job was done in 10 minutes using basic tools.

 

Sterling Power Products Pure Sine Wave Inverter repaired

Inverter, repaired in the workshop

For those wondering what an ‘inverter’ is, let me give a quick explanation:  It allows one to use a mains operated device on the move, using a power supply from a motor-home, car or boat, as an example.  An inverter ‘inverts’ a smaller voltage to a larger one, usually for most applications.  Most inverters sold turn either 12 or 24VDC to 240VAC or 110VAC.

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FixItWorkshop, April’17, Worthing, Sterling Power Products Pure Sine Wave Inverter Pro Power SB 600W

The owner of this one had accidentally connected the input wires the wrong way around, effectively reversing the polarity.  Not good.  Upon hearing a little ‘pop’ the owner quickly disconnected the power!

Having never worked on an inverter before, I turned to the manufacturer for advice.  Sterling Power (UK) were not able to supply any product information on the phone nor via email and were generally not very helpful at all.  They did offer a very reasonable 25% discount on a replacement, but were not able to offer much else to save the one I had in the workshop.  Never mind.

Back to the problem.  Checking the basics, the ‘accident’ had appeared to knocked-out three 25A soldered PCB fuses.  Temporarily by-passing the fuses revealed a working unit, so replacing the defective fuses was a good idea at a very reasonable £1.50.

The fuses are mini-blade 25A automotive fuses.  Once removed and the new ones soldered in place, the unit worked once more.

Cost of parts, £1.50, cost of replacement unit, circa £160.00.

I’ve also covered this repair overview in a video:  https://youtu.be/nmnSRwQdSvY

 

Erratic GHD hair straighteners

Straight GHDs

GHD hair straighteners are a premium product which retail for a minimum of £100 in the UK.  However, over time they suffer from common annoying faults which cause owners to condemn the set they have.

This set of straighteners presented ‘as working’ when first switched on.  After warming up, hair straightening temperature was reached within the normal time.  However, after 5 minutes of use, the temperature reduced and failed to re-heat in a reasonable time.  Leaving the straighteners to cool completely would effectively reset the problem, only for  the cycle to repeat again.

GHD faults are well documented on YouTube and the fault turned out to be a faulty thermocouple or thermofuse, which should regulate the temperature and cut power in the event of a fault.  They do however wear out and this set of straighteners was no exception.

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FixItWorkshop, Feb’17, Worthing, GHD Hair Straighteners …repaired!

After dismantling, the thermal fuse was replaced for £2.70.  The whole job took half an hour and saved the owner nearly £100 on a replacement.

Stories from the workshop…

Fix It Workshop’s diary of a tinkerer. Stories and hints to inspire your own repair.

On this blog, I’ll be writing about the things I fix and those I can’t, or are just beyond economical help.  I hope my ramblings will at least inspire others to think twice before just accepting that something doesn’t work.

To those who doubt their own ability I say this:  If ‘that thing’ isn’t working, grab a screwdriver, take it apart and investigate.  What have you got to lose?

Within reason, I’ll try and repair most domestic items before condemning them to landfill or recycling and I hope there are many other shed-dwellers doing the same thing.

In our modern ‘throw it away culture’ one could be called ‘cheap’ for attempting to make-do-and-mend.  This is madness as often good quality items end up on the scrap heap with little required to get them back in working order.

While throwing things in the bin and buying new is good news for the economy, we live in a world where the strains on our environment are increasingly evident and repairing things that can be repaired usually makes economic and ecological sense.  I’m a Circular Economy advocate.

My aim here is to promote the art of repair and reuse.  I also offer a local repair service in Worthing, West Sussex, UK, for a small fee, if I can fix it!