Classic (asthmatic) Dyson DC01

A tired DC01 gets some TLC

Starting a new job is always fun and when a new colleague of mine mentioned that the office vacuum cleaner had packed up, I rose to the challenge.

I’m quite fond of Dyson products as some of you know, mainly because:

  • They’re well-engineered, by engineers
  • They’re designed to be repaired easily with simple tools, which is better for everyone
  • Parts are readily available at reasonable prices

The DC01 was launched in the early 90’s and was Dyson’s first market clean-up, competing with the established market leaders.  Although this machine is over 20 years old and Dyson no longer supports it directly, reasonable quality pattern parts are available on eBay.  If you have one, love it and keep it going.

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FixItWorkshop, Worthing, November’18, Dyson DC01

This one is actually an ‘Antarctica Solo’ model (grey and light blue instead of yellow), which commemorated Sir Ranulph Fiennes’ solo trek across Antarctica and raised money for Breakthrough Cancer.  It had been abandoned and was moments away from the skip.  I felt quite sorry for it.

Faults reported included; no suction, excess noise and smell!

The first thing to check on the DC01 is the filters, as like many other Dyson products, people forget to clean or change the filters.  Both filters were totally choked and full of all sorts of detritus.  A quick shake out and wash with warm soapy water and they were as good as new.  Following that, I inspected the seals around the join between the cylinder and the main body.  All the seals were dirty, so a clean up and quick spray with silicone spray and they were as good as new.  Great.

The noise seemed to be coming from the front beater/ rollers which usually means, noise bearings.  The beater on this model uses a two bearing set up.  One was fine, but the other was seized.  As I didn’t want to spend any more than I needed, I cleaned the bearing, after removing it and the dust cover, re-greased it with LM High-Melt Point grease (general automotive stuff) and it was ready to roll and beat again.

 

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Once the filters were dry and re-installed, the Dyson ran like new again.  Very satisfying.

Cost of replacement:  £15 second hand, £100’s for an equivalent-ish new model.

Cost of repair:  Patience, washing up liquid, two cups of tea.

Unsteady Dyson DC24 Roller Ball

A neglected DC24 gets some badly needed maintenance…

I really enjoy working on Dyson products as they’re so well thought out.  The designers seem to take great care factoring-in easy maintenance for longevity.  There’s also a great sense of theatre when using Dyson products.  Take the roller ball on this design for example, a throwback to the earlier Dyson Ball Barrow which allows better manoeuvrability when combined with an upright vacuum cleaner.  There’s also the exposed mechanism which automatically switches suction between the roller pick-up and hose when using the foot pedal to select the desired mode.  Genius.  All of these design touches encourage the user to care for and enjoy using the product.

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FixItWorkshop, April’18, Dyson DC24 (DC04 just in view too- how things have changed).

Sadly though, sometimes these touches are a bit lost on people and the design flares that appeal to some become misunderstood and neglected to others.

This DC24 had two problems.  It didn’t stand up properly when left and it didn’t really pick anything up that well either, failing as a vacuum cleaner on two fundamental points.

The first job was to find out why the DC24 was a little unsteady.  It seemed that all of the mechanism was intact and that nothing had snapped off.  Strange.  The red foot pedal operated lever that releases the latching system to move the main body from its locked position was stuck.  It seemed to be linked to a lever which operates the diverter valve, which switches suction from the roller beater foot to the flexible hose.  On closer inspection the lever on the diverter valve had come off its pin, probably by force.  The mechanism itself was also dirty which made operation rough.  The red lever is spring loaded with guides and pins which were also dirty and a little rusty.  I suspect this vacuum cleaner had been left somewhere damp.

After re-attaching the diverter valve leaver back on and giving all mechanisms a good clean-up with a light coating of silicone spray, it was as good as new again.

Once the mechanism was working, it was time to assess the vacuum’s performance.  It wasn’t that good.  As with most Dyson vacuum products, there are two filters.  One processes blow-by air from the motor and the other controls dust particles from the cylinder.  These filters can usually be cleaned with mild soap and water, but this set was well past it, requiring replacement and for under a tenner, it’s rude not to.  Dyson have made filter replacement very easy on the DC24 with good access to the motor filter via a small door on the roller ball itself and the lid on top of the cylinder.  I think there should be a massive sticker on these vacuum cleaners that says ‘don’t forget to clean the filters’ as I suspect that many of these products are chucked away by owners who forget to do the necessary.  Bag-less cleaner doesn’t mean maintenance-free!

With a couple of new filters, a clean-up of all of the rubber seals with silicone cleaner and this DC24 was fighting fit, ready to clean another carpet.

Cost of a replacement Dyson product:  £000’s.    Cost of new parts:  Under £10 plus my time.

 

Hybrid Hoover-VAX vacuum cleaner combination experiment…

Recycling vacuum cleaner parts.

A slightly unusual workshop repair this time.

My brother-in-law popped in to see us for a cuppa recently and mentioned he was off to the tip with an old VAX cylinder style bag-less vacuum cleaner, in pieces, not the carpet washer type.  It was on its way to the great scrap yard in the sky.  Luckily, I was on hand to divert the sick VAX via the workshop.

It was being disposed of due to the flex having gone faulty together with the opinion that it wasn’t working that well before the mains cable failed.  Well, I hate to see good machinery go to waste.

On this VAX, the mains flex is stored within the vacuum cleaner housing and is wound up on a spring-loaded coil during storage.  When in use, the user can pull the mains plug until the desired cable flex length is reached.  When the user is finished cleaning their carpet, a foot operated button causes the flex to speedily disappear back in to the vacuum cleaner.  My brother-in-law had already looked at the spring-loaded mains flex winding mechanism, which had resulted in the bi-metallic coil spring escaping from the enclosure, freeing itself in to an orbit.  It’s quite a shock and sometimes dangerous when this happens!

What to do.  I was very nearly tempted to dump this vacuum cleaner too as the build quality of the whole thing reminded me of the plastic toys one gets in Christmas crackers, but that’s not really in the spirit of The Workshop.

Then I remembered I had a defunct Hoover Telios that was minus a motor, perhaps this would be a suitable parts donor?  I liked the idea of making one working vacuum cleaner from two unhappy ones.

The Telios had a working mains lead flex, but the automatic spring loaded mechanism on that was past its best, so I decided to use the working lead on the VAX.  The VAX would be without its flex winding mechanism, but at least it would work.  I adapted a cable tie to make a cable grip, to prevent a user from pulling the cable from the VAX, when in use.  The cable would have to be stored, wrapped around the vacuum cleaner, after use, a small price for working machine.

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FixItWorkshop, Feb’18, VAX cylinder vacuum cleaner.

The other job was to address the poor performance.

This product is clearly an inferior Dyson rip-off and therefore has a couple of filters; one for the intake and one for the exhaust, like a Dyson.  As suspected, both of these were virtually blocked!  The filters on this model were not as easy to get at nor as easy to clean.  I’m not sure whether these filters are meant to be washed, but wash them I did and after 24 hours of drying on the radiator, they were as good as new.  Once refitted, full performance was restored, for the price of a bowl of warm water and Fairy liquid.

Finally, the VAX was missing its cleaning head for the hose, so I decided to use the Hoover one (which was quite a nice design) with the VAX’s hose.  After some jiggery pokery and some electrical tape, it fitted.

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FixItWorkshop, Feb’18, VAX cylinder vacuum cleaner- with Hoover parts.

What we’ve now ended up with is a working VAX vacuum cleaner, using some parts from a beyond economical to repair Hoover.  Whilst it’s not the most elegant repair I’ve ever completed, I now have  something working from two nearly condemned items and surely, that’s good thing?

G.E.T. Dehumidifier with damp issues…

GET dehumidifier with damp issues…

Over a cuppa, my mother in law mentioned that she was chucking out a dehumidifer this weekend and had already replaced it.  This was a shock to me since it hadn’t started it’s journey to Worthing tip via my shed yet.  Time to intervene.

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FixItWorkshop, Jan’18, GET Dehumidifier repair.

Aparently it had overflowed water all over the floor and had cut out and not restarted.  It had probably been left to its own devices in their cellar, totally neglected in the run up to its demise.

Before worrying my toolbox, I usually plug things in and press buttons to see what happens.  When connecting this dehumidifier to the mains, it fired-up and seemed to run perfectly.  Strange.

Looking at the device in more detail revealed three tell-tale LED lights (cooling, empty the tank and running).  The tank was removable from the front and featured a small float operated level which married up to a small microswitch.  The idea being that when the water rose to the top, the switch would be activated by the float and the machine would cut out safely, all being well.

The lever mechanism on the float seemed to be stiff and all that was required to restore service was a good clean with a brush and Fairy liquid and some silicone spray, once dried.

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FixItWorkshop, Jan’18, GET Dehumidifier repair, microswitch.

While giving the unit a general inspection, I noticed dirt in the units’ grille.  Fortunately, the grille had a removable filter which had clearly never been cleaned, so in effect had been chocking the dehumidifer in normal operation.  Bad news.

Piecing the evidence together in my mind surrounding the causes of failure, I came up with the following theory.  The float had failed, causing the unit to leak.  The unit had then run hot, probably for a while and had probably tripped a thermal protection fuse.  I have no evidence for the latter idea as I never opened up the unit fully, but the theory fits the sequence of events.

In any case, the dehimidifier now switches on and switches off when full and doesn’t seem to run hot.  I was pleased with that.  I wasn’t so pleased that my in-laws wanted the unit back.

Cost of replacement: Circa £100.  Cost of repair; cleaning stuff.

 

Flimsy Bosch Athlet 25.2V cordless vacuum cleaner

I quite like the idea of this vacuum cleaner in that it’s lightweight, easy to use, highly portable and easy to maintain. All things that make a great product.

The particular vacuum cleaner came in to the workshop, just outside of its warranty period and had been looked after well.  However, it had developed a nasty intermittent cutting-out problem when in use.  I also noticed that the charger’s flex had also cracked near the wall plug, making it dangerous while charging.

First things first and it was off with the rollers and filters to clean any obstructions that might make a device like this overheat.  Nothing obvious there, but all items cleaned and washed as a precaution to allow the roller to move freely and the vacuum to breathe easily.

Closer inspection of the handle area revealed a weakness in the design which had meant that the quick-release mechanism had caused an electrical connection to degrade, causing the cutting out.

The only remedy was to address the handle’s weak point with a mechanical fix and make good the electrical contact.

I hope Bosch take note and make an improvement in this area on an otherwise nicely engineered item.

I also did a small repair to the damaged flex on the charger.

Cost of a new vacuum cleaner, circa £250.  Cost of screw… less than 50p (without my time of course!)

Here’s a little video of the repair…

 

 

Incontinent Porsche Boxster (986)

An annoying leak, sorted.

A slight departure from my usual ramblings about white goods and other domestic appliances in this entry.  Outside of The Workshop, I’m a keen petrol head who loves to tinker with cars and motorbikes and my own car was suffering from a recent bout of coolant incontinence.

Like me, most owners of these cars dread anything like this happening as it usually means big money.

The leak only happened when the car cooled after it was was run up to temperature and was evident in the area under the oil filter housing.  Luckily, the leak wasn’t serious and was repairable with a 10mm spanner, washing-up bowl and 4000 grit sandpaper.

Here’s a little video which I hope will help other Boxtser owners.