Money, that’s what I want

A cool 1980s toy robot money box gets repaired.

Who doesn’t like a toy robot? I mean, everyone loves a toy robot, especially one with pop up eyes and one that eats coins.  No?  Well, you’re wrong if you don’t agree!

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FixItWorkshop, March’19, Tomy Mr. Money.

This is my own Tomy Mr. Money, which I’ve had since about 1988 ish, so it’s getting on a bit.  Like me.

Back then, I wasn’t that diligent about leaving batteries in situ for long periods and when I dusted off this piece of retro cool for my daughter to play with, we discovered that the passing of time had not been kind to the old battery or insides.  Which was a bit of a shame.

However, I wanted to show everyone that old toys are way cooler than new ones, so out with the screwdrivers, cleaning stuff and hammer (well, not the hammer) to see what could be done.

Luckily for me and Mr. Money, the battery compartment hadn’t fared too badly with just light corrosion to the battery terminals, which soon cleaned off with brake cleaner and some light filing to near good as new standard.

With a new AA battery installed, Mr. Money didn’t really respond that well to having money placed on his hand.  In years gone by, a coin placed on his hand would trigger his eyes to open, the hand to raise to his mouth, the coin to be eaten and lips to be licked, as well as doing a little side to side dance.  Mr.Money was now looking a bit arthritic.  Could it be that new money is a lot lighter than the 1980s money he was designed for or was it just that the battery corrosion had run deeper than first appeared.  I suspected the latter.

I took Mr. Money apart and found that the microswitch that triggers the mechanism was corroded and needed cleaning and that some of the moving parts also needed a quick brush up, all of which had Mr.Money back to rude health.

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FixItWorkshop, March’19, Tomy Mr.Money, in pieces.

While doing the repair, I decided that it wasn’t obvious how the toy came apart and that some owners might decide to scrap theirs due to similar problems.  So, I decided to make a little slide show of the dismantling, to help others.  Enjoy.

Cost of replacement:  £ priceless/ eBay if you’re lucky.  Cost of repair:  One IPA beer.

 

SEG DVB Digital TV box

It went bang, ooops!

It’s important to talk about failure as we can often learn from it and this brief write-up is all about something which left the workshop, ready for recycling.  I made it go bang, sadly.

Remember TVs before the networks ‘went digital’? They had analogue tuners built-in, which received the signals.  With so many old TVs out there, manufacturers sold digital set-top boxes, which allowed an older TV to work with the new digital TV stations from about 2007.  Since then, manufacturers include a digital receiver within their TVs of course and this particular device now seems a bit of a museum piece.

This SEG DVB Digital TV box had failed completely, so off with the lid.  Once open, the printed circuit board (PCB) was revealed.  The PCB on this device was made in two halves; one for the TV reception stuff and one for the power, the conversion of mains electricity to lower DC working voltages.  The power part of the board had some visible damage and it appeared that a smoothing capacitor had gone pop.

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FixItWorkshop, Worthing, November’18, SEG Digital TV box
FixItWorkshop, Worthing, November’18, SEG Digital TV box

As it happened, I had a similar device on the shelf I was gradually stripping for spares and was able to quickly identify a suitable replacement.  Once re-soldered in and powered-up, nothing happened!

Then I spotted an on-board fuse which had also failed, but I didn’t have one of these, so I decided to temporarily short the fuse connections to make a connection.  That’s when things got smoky.

I’d missed the fact that a small transformer on the PCB had a winding short on it, which had impacted on the rest of the components.  Bang.

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Never mind.  Digital boxes are still available online and that’s what I did, I ordered a new one.

Although I didn’t win this one, it’s important to have a go and that’s the whole point.  If it’s not working to begin with, what’s the worst that can happen?

Cost of repair:  A new DVB box at about £20. 

 

Slow Fisher-Price Mechanical Music Box Record Player

Repaired Fisher Price record player

Here’s a blast from the past:  A mechanical toy, that’s really cool.  One that brings fond memories from my childhood… I’m 38 as I write this (I’m 40 as I edit this- time goes so fast).

Strictly speaking, this is not a customer’s toy, but a family heirloom which had been festering in the shed for over 20 years.  Consequently, it now wasn’t in great shape.

After dusting it down, we realised that records were playing intermittently and slowly at best and the problem seemed related to the rather cool winding mechanism within.

After dismantling the unit and giving the mechanicals a light service, the turntable platter turned freely once again.  Our two (now three) year old daughter can now play with the record player as her mum did – very cute.

 

Enjoy!