Kenwood FP220 easy fix

An easy fix for a change

Every now and then an enquiry drops into my inbox where my heart sinks.  It sinks as I know that many products on sale are poorly supported for specific spares which means that when the product fails, it can be impossible to repair.  But sometimes, just sometimes, I’m surprised!

Make and model:  Kenwood FP220 Food Mixer

Fault reported: Mixer not working when main jug used

Cost of replacement:  £120.00 (equivalent new machine)

Cost of parts:  £17.69 (plus my time)

Hours spent on repair:  About 10 minutes (test and cleaning)

Tools needed:  None.

Sundry items: 1 X Grimex cloth

Repair difficulty:  1/10

IMG_9581
FixItWorkshop, Worthing, June’19, Kenwood FP220.

The mixer was a good quality item which had cost over £100 when new and upon inspection, the mixer has failed due to a single component, the main jug.  A little clue from the owner that the blender attachment (not pictured) worked, but the jug didn’t, set me off on the right track.

The mixer features a safety mechanism which is designed to prevent the main drive assembly spinning accidently, potentially with a cutting tool, if the switch is operated without the mixer jug attached.  Many mixers of this type feature such a device.

The FP220 features a double-armed safety mechanism which means that the jug must be fully engaged in the mixer base, with the lid in the correct position.  It’s an unobtrusive and fail-safe design.  A part of the jug’s base, made of a composite plastic, had sheared off, so the jug could not attach to the mixer properly.  The safety device had worked as it should.

At first, I thought that there was no chance of obtaining a spare jug, but after a bit of Googling, I found a brand-new replacement jug, in the right colour, from Sussex Spares (via eBay).  It soon arrived and fitted perfectly, which allowed the machine to work again, once more.  The old lid was still serviceable and fitted the new jug without problems.  I recommended that owner keep the old jug for spares as the handle and drive coupling were still servicable and might come in handy if the new handle gets broken.

After a quick clean up and test, the machine was ready to make Victoria Sponges again.  It just proves that with a bit of research, even seemingly unrepairable items can get a second chance.

Author: fixitworkshop.co.uk

Hi, my name's Matt and I'm on a mission to save everyday items from the bin. Many things are repairable, but we've seemingly fallen out of love with mending things. I aim to fix that by publishing each repair I carry out in the hope that others will be inspired to repair their things and keep them for longer.

9 thoughts on “Kenwood FP220 easy fix”

  1. Hi Matt, I really enjoyed your video on repairing the control board on the orange Kenwood chef.
    I’ve been given a KM400 which was running slow and I believe finally stopped working.
    I’ve stripped it and have initially ordered new carbon brushes.
    I probably should have done some investigation on the motor before doing so but being a bit “gung ho” I went for it.
    Gosh £18.80 for New brushes!
    Do you think I’ve done the right thing?
    The old brushes are 25mm, so not worn out!
    Appreciate any advice…..
    Kind regards,
    Derek

    Like

    1. Hi Derek, glad you found the blog useful. Your brushes didn’t sound that worn from the measurements you’ve given. I wonder if there’s something else affecting things. Have a look at the speed control components for damage.

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      1. Hi Matt, Sorry it’s taken me this long to see your reply. I’m afraid the replacement brushes did not fix the problem.
        If I connect the motor and speed control module and plug in the power supply, I just hear a click when turning the control knob.
        Taking the voltage across the Blue/Yellow plug I get 114volts but turning the control knob does not change this voltage!
        Do I take it the variable resistor has failed & I should just replace the board unit?
        I see no signs of damage/burns on the PCB.
        Thank you so much,
        Derek

        Like

  2. Hi Matt, Sorry it’s taken me this long to see your reply. I’m afraid the replacement brushes did not fix the problem.
    If I connect the motor and speed control module and plug in the power supply, I just hear a click when turning the control knob.
    Taking the voltage across the Blue/Yellow plug I get 114volts but turning the control knob does not change this voltage!
    Do I take it the variable resistor has failed & I should just replace the board unit?
    Thank you so much,
    Derek

    Like

    1. Hi Derek, it’s hard to say, but the PCB could be at fault. It’s so difficult to diagnose this kind of thing over email. If the PCBs are not expensive, then maybe try a new one, as long as you’re happy with the motor.

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      1. Hi Matt, that was quick. Well I’m not 100% sure of the motor itself. Continuity wise it tests ok.
        Can I test it by bypassing the speed control unit attached?
        I thought of just holding it in a vice and testing it.
        £25 for a new PCB, seems reasonable but not if I then find out it’s the electric motor 😦
        Then that’s another £55.
        Oh dear.
        Thanks again for your help,
        Derek

        Like

      2. Hi Matt, just wanted to tell you, I replaced the PCB and she’s back in action.
        Thanks again. Very satisfying to take these apart and fix.
        Cheers, Derek

        Like

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