A little bit of a Mickey Mouse repair

A novelty pen holder gets a new lease of life

Even as a seasoned repairer you sometimes think hmm, I don’t think I’m going to be able to help this time. I might end up making it worse. This was nearly the case when a lady brought me this Mickey Mouse desktop organiser thingy, in to the workshop for repair.

I’ve never really been a fan of Mickey Mouse. However, after a few minutes of chat with the owner and me staring at Mickey’s face, he started to work his magic somehow. I don’t know if it was the friendly face, disproportionately large ears, or something about that unique colour combination, but at that moment, I decided that I had to help.

This is how it starts for many others, I’m sure.

Make and model: Mickey Mouse desk organiser

Fault reported: snapped-off hand

Cost of replacement: £?

Manufacturer support:  0/10

Cost of parts: £1.00

My repair time: 1 hour

Tools needed: Small file, drill

Sundry items: Paint, car body filler, glue, bit of a rivet

Cleaning materials: Polish

Repair difficulty: 4/10

Cups of tea: 1

Biscuits: 1 Bourbon

This beloved Mickey Mouse pen holder belongs to a local Worthing teacher and had previously adorned her desk for many years until Mickey had an accident, leaving his left arm broken. Ouch.

Despite home attempts involving sticky tape and super glue, his arm simply wouldn’t heal, so the owner did the responsible thing, taking him to hospital. The hospital in this case was my shed.

Resin-formed sculptures like this are tricky to mend as unless you know the resin’s formula, you don’t really know how a general glue will react. And react they can. Get the glue type wrong and you can turn your once loved plastic gem in to a smoking mess. Believe me, I’ve done it.

Fortunately, the super glue used previously hadn’t done much harm, but it had eroded some arm away.

So, I had a hand and an arm stump. Not much to go on. Whilst mulling Mickey’s issue over a brew, it became clear that the only way to go was to use a little bit of ‘real-world’ tech. Cutting down a spare aluminium rivet to use as a ‘bone’ pin, I was able to drill in to both hand stump and arm and use the pin to hold both parts together. I set the pin in place using some fairly inert Gorilla Glue (good stuff). However, this isn’t the end of the repair.

There was a gap around the join as material was missing. I decided to form a new wrist at Mickey’s stump using some car body filler, left over from my years of Mini ownership. A little dab of filler around the joint, followed by a few hours wait, followed by a small rub down and the arm was ready for paint. The mouse’s body is finished in a satin black so I decided to recoat the arm using some Fortress black anti-reflective brush-on paint, that I had in the shed, as you do.

After 24 hours of close observation, waiting for the paint to dry, Mickey was ready to leave hospital.

Re-vamped Micro Mini Scooter (just for fun).

A Micro Mini Scooter repair, just for fun!

I really had no idea that Micro Scooters have been a ‘thing’ for the last few years and as a result, there are lots to choose from on the second-hand market.  We picked up a ‘bargain’ for our oldest daughter for a princely sum of £5.00 via a local Facebook For Sale page.  With hindsight, it was overpriced.

Just about every part of the scooter was either nasty or plain broken.  The handle bar grips were missing, the wheel bearings were all shot to pieces, the steering mechanism seized and the rear brake was missing.  The back brake on this scooter type, I’ve since found out, have a habit of snapping off with hard use, so that should have been the clue to the low, low price.  But if you read these pages, you know me, I like a challenge.

First step was to address the static wheels.  An Allen key holds the wheels on to the stub-axels at the front of the scooter and there’s something similar on the trailing wheel.  The bearings on our wheels were beyond a re-grease as they’d appeared to have spent their entire life at the bottom of The Channel.

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Luckily, the bearings are easy to replace and good-quality generic items are available on eBay for under £5.00 for a whole set (6 bearings, 2 per wheel).

Next came the handlebar grips.  Ours were missing and again, generic ‘copy’ grips are available on eBay which are perfect for the job and are half the price of the original equipment.  While I was shopping on eBay, I also found an original Micro Scooter bell.  Just the job.

IMG_5715
FixItWorkshop, May’18, Micro Mini Scooter, new handlebar grips and bell fitted, prior to painting.

The steering mechanism was next and all it needed was a good clean up and light lubrication with some plastic-friendly white PTFE grease, readily available from Toolstation.

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The shabby foot plate area was once baby-blue but had since faded and had evidence of scrapes.  It looked a bit sorry for itself.  I decided to address this by giving surfaces a good clean up and then key with wire wool.  A couple of coats of good quality plastic primer and then a couple of coats of vinyl black paint, which now gave the scooter quite a ‘presence’.  I then decided to improve the foot plate ‘grippy-ness’ by applying a custom grip tape design.

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Before re-attaching the foot plate back to the chassis, the brake needed to be replaced.  As with some of the other fixings on the scooter, the brake’s fixings were so rusty, they needed to be drilled out and replaced.  Luckily the new original equipment brake came with new improved fixings which fitted perfectly.

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Thanks to the cool dudes at Alleyoops, Worthing for their help and advice www.alleyoopsskates.co.uk.  The UK Micro website is also very good as it lists spare parts www.micro-scooters.co.uk/spares-support.

Micro Mini Scooter (AKA ‘Triggers Broom’) renovation spend, May’18:

New good quality bearings                                                        eBay                      £4.15

Generic copy Micro Scooter handlebar grips                         eBay                      £9.75

Genuine Micro Scooter bell                                                        eBay                      £7.78

Paint and sundries                                                                        Shed                      £2.00 (approx.)

Grip Tape (customised to fit)                                                       Alleyoops            £8.00

Genuine Micro rear brake                                                            Alleyoops            £8.99

 

Total                      £40.67

I know what you’re thinking… for £40 more, I could have bought a brand-new scooter and saved myself the bother.  At times, I did question my own sanity.  But what we now have is a perfectly serviceable, one-off that no one else will have.  Can you put a price on that?!